Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘pattern’

As far as knitting goes, I’ve got several other wips and, gladly, FOs! Each of them deserves an individual entry but before I could ever manage doing it, I’ve got some photos for one project I love most.

I started knitting this pair of gloves in spring this year, hoping to be able to submit it for Knitty’s early holiday knits. But, as always, I was distracted by several other projects. To make the matter slightly worse, a deep dark brown colour like that needs your extra attention, which I couldn’t afford sometimes. Only until September did I pick them up occasionally, with knitting done the week before the last.

It needs a name 1

It has lace. It has slip-stitch.

It needs a name 3

It has cable.

It needs a name 2

They are long!

I will try to finish up the pattern asap and offer the patter for sale–I do want to offer it for free but considering the amount of time I spent writing up, answering questions, and doing anything ever related to it, and I’ve never sold a pattern before, I’ll start with this one.

Before that, a name is needed for the pattern, and more photos should be taken. To be totally honest, I still have to tidy up yarn tails and everything. 🙂

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

This post is about a knitting technique that I used for the fichu Afternoon Break. The aim of this technique is to allow the continous knitting of two different sections from the same starting point, without picking up stitches there. Once you get the first few stitches done, you’ll find how easy it could be! Eventually the technique will save you some time and result in a smooth transition! (or at least I hope you’ll think the same!)

You can use this technique on both sides, and I am showing it from the right side, because I spilt the neck band and the upper trim from the right side in Afternoon Break. Apart from the pair of needles you’re using, you’ll need two other spare needles, preferably of smaller sizes (they don’t have to be same size), for seperating those stitches.

1.
Tutorial

This is the beginning of a right side row. I have 14 stitches on the needle (10 st st and 2 edge stitches on both sides).

2.
Tutorial

(RS) Simply knit back and front of each stitch (increase one each stitch). 28 stitches on the needle.

3.
Tutorial

(WS) Use the first spare needle to transfer the first stich on the left needle. The use the second spare needle to transfer the second stitch. To show this clearly, in the picture, I put the first needle in front of the WS and the second needle behind it. The following picutres are for the purpose of showing the transfer step by step.

4.
Tutorial

Transfer the third stitch on the left needle to the first spare needle (front needle).

5.
Tutorial

Transfer the fourth stitch on the left needle to the second spare needle (back needle).

6.
Tutorial

Continue putting the odd-numbered onto the first spare needle and the even-numbered onto the second. This picture shows that I have transferred 8 stitches onto both needles: four onto each spare needles. At this point, you should feel at ease transferring stitches this way!

7.
Tutorial

After doing this the whole row, now you’ll have odd-numbered on the first spare/front needle and the even-numbered on the second spare/back needle, if seeing from the WS. The picture shows it from RS, so the first spare needle is on the back (the one with yarn tail). If you don’t like the feeling of dangling needles, feel free to transfer the non-working row to a strand of waste yarn. Now you’re ready to continue the knitting of different session!

8.
Tutorial

This picture is just showing what it looks like if knitting the back session first–it will leave you with a row of live stitch in front of the piece.

I hope this tutorial would be helpful. ^_^

Read Full Post »

My regular life in the past few weeks was loaded with streams of unexpected activies because of some interview invitations (one from a UK top Ten Uni! though I didn’t get the job). I had to read plays and articles, as well as visit some archives, of all had nothing to do with my own work. I imagine in the following weeks, life would be the same, except that we’ll get more and more sunshine and this fact along cheers me up!

The progress of my work is reasonably lagging behind, which I tried to rectify the situation whenever possible, but the knitting was doing fine-not as much as I’d like it to be, but I did manage to have TWO FOs in the past month. These became my second and third FO of the year (not very productive) and in the end it became relatively unstilumating, because I was knitting the same design, the first time I’ve ever knitted one pattern twice!!

I cannot reveal the pattern just now, but it will be published online very soon. The pattern is done, but I am still struggling to master Adobe Illustrator in order to perfect the pattern. I love this photos, so until it get published, I am posting it here nonetheless:

soon to be my 3rd FO this year

As always, I am lucky enough to be able to get “Vogue Knitting” early (a.k.a. the not-so-vogue Designers Knitting for us UK knitters), directly from the USA.
The fake VK

With limited knitting time, it makes more sense to me to design and knit my own patterns, however, sometimes there is just something very beautiful that I’ll have to make it, so I cast on this one,

Lace stocking from VK though I never am a sock knitter! Plus, it would mean that I’d got a pair of stocking very soon, if I didn’t get the second sock syndrom this time. 🙂 Probably won’t–there are 4 charts needed for this design, one is available on the magazine, and three others from the website. As of this morning, VK hasn’t uploaded the rest of the charts! This means I’ll have to put on hold the first sock and cast on the second sock tomorrow and doing so reduce the possibility of getting second sock syndrom.

All I hope is VK uploading them before I depart for my (working-)holiday next Tuesday!

Read Full Post »

I know I will thank myself for keeping knitting notes, the sole purpose of this blog–I shall keep this blog alive! here are notes of the week.

*Few notes on Heartening

Last week, I wonder if I should knit another “Heartening”, so I can show you the slightly different version with the heart jointed. What harm can be done for just one more vest? Or better, making “Heartening” as a puff-sleeved, collared top just like Number 22 from the latest Vogue Knitting? I do have Soft Tweed in Twig enough for a sleeved top! I cast on after I found myself couldn’t sleep one night.

Making “Heartening” is fun. But even though the whole process is lovely, it would become dull had I gone through the same procedure again. I eventually didn’t survive the waistline and had my mind changed: Twig is a lovely shade and it would suit my boyfriend perfectly! Why didn’t I just do that but play with the same pattern?

Indeed so. I stopped after the waist shaping. But since I was with the WIP, I may as well knit a semi-swatch to show you the different Row 18 of the heart shaped cable pattern. The one on the right is Row 18* and the one on the left is Row 18. This semi-swatch is unblocked, so it looks a bit ugly, but enough to show their differences (I put some notes directly onto this shot on my flickr, please click to link to my flickr if needed).
heartening hearty shapes

If you like Row 18* more and you knit from the chart, please also read the pattern instruction first! The chart is showing the effect seeing from the right side, however, you will need to knit Row 18 from the wrong side!

And two picture showing FO done months ago.
Wintery stockingsLana Grossa wraparound

It seems I have the tendency to take photos after FOs are wore, and got felted? I post these pictures on my flickr first, but only manage to blog them here now. I am quite surprise to know people love the Highland Stockings! It’s absolutely gorgeous! It is quite a pity that Rowan didn’t provide a chart but with written instruction only. Moreover, Rowan put the skill level as most difficult one. Certainly reading the pattern is punishing to me so, as I put in another post, I charted them out when I decided to knit the stockings. I was convinced that had them put up charts the pattern would be popular.

Read Full Post »

I had a stressful Christmas holiday this winter, overwhelmed by many events. Because of these events, I didn’t and couldn’t knit after I cast off the last minutes present on Christmas Day. Then on 2nd January, it seemed I could at least sit back and relax for some moments, so I decided to cast on for a new project for the new year!

Here’s the result: Heartening.
Heartening 1

Heartening 4Heartening 3
Isn’t it silly? *giggling*

I hope some of you will like this bold yet not too overwhelming vest. Anyway, it’s a quick project, and cost me 3 balls of Soft Tweed only. The knitting was done on 4th Jan, then I lightly blocked it, and took photos on 5th Jan, and wrote up the pattern!

I’ve been wanting to use this heart-shaped stitch pattern since I saw it on Vogue: Dictionary of Knitting Stitiches by Anne Matthews. The cable panel looks complicated but they are combinations of small cables. These easy cables make the vest the perfect project for a first-time cable knitter, or someone who’d like to learn cabling without a cable needle! The vest is knitted in round from waist up to armhole, then knitted in flat for upper front and back. The cable panel is placed immediately above the “waistline”, an eyelet row where you can add an optional ribbon. After shaping necks, use three-needle bind off for shoulders, then pick up stitches around neckline (including those on hold), and knit the collar. No seaming is required! You can adjust this pattern very easily to fit your own curve. And you can choose between two different heart shapes by knitting either Row 18 or Row 18* of the central panel.

However, this is the first time I am writing patterns for sizes other than XS, and my experiences wih larger sizes are very limited, so do forgive me that I couldn’t pretend to speak for other sizes. I planned to extend the pattern for bigger sizes by swatching, but, but, it is not possible for me to do so just now. Your feedbacks are most welcomed!

**Please do let me know if you’d like to reproduce/republish this pattern in any form or you are inspired by it.**

Heartening
(click to take you to Ravelry pattern page)

SIZE
XS/S [M, L, XL] (shown in size XS/S)

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS
Chest: 33[35.4, 39.4, 43.25] inches
Length: 20.5 [21.25, 22, 22.8] inches

MATERIALS
[MC] Rowan Classic Yarn Soft Tweed [56% Wool, 20% Viscose, 14% polyamide, 10% silk; 87 yd/ 80 m per 50g skein]; color: Bramble (shade 004); 3[4, 4, 5] skeins
[CC] Louisa Harding Kashmir DK [10% Cashmere, 55% Merino Wool, 35% Microfibre; 130 yd/ 119 m per 50g skein]; color: 01; about 2m
1 pair of 40-inch (or longer, I use a 60-inch pair) US #8-11/5mm-8mm circular needle (size to obtain gauge)
1 pair of 16-inch (or longer) circular needles in smaller size
1 pair of 16-inch (or longer) circular needles in still smaller size (optional)
Suitable length of ribbon or ribbon yarn. (optional)

GAUGE
12 sts/ 16 rows = 4″ in stockinette stitch

PATTERN NOTES

Rib pattern 1 (waist): K3, p2

Rib pattern 2 (collar): K1, p1

Decrease:
SSk after the marker and K2tog before it.

Increase:
Knit one stitch each from the stitch immediately after and before the marker by inserting needle into the right/left part of the stitch in the previous row.

Central panel:
Working over 20 sts. Cable panel are working on the central 16st between eyelet sections (2 sts each on both side of the cable). Please follow either the chart or the written instruction. Both the chart and the written instruction are for circular knitting and read from the right side. Work eyelet rows in symmetry (ie. either begin with: Yo, SSK, Cable, k2tog, yo, or K2tog, yo, cable, yo, SSK, and do the other the next odd row). Don’t worry if you started these vertical eyelets different than given chart/instruction, you will see how to achieve the symmetry when you go easily.

Heartening chart

Written instruction for the chart:
Preparation rows:
1 K2tog, yo, p6, k4, p6, yo, ssk
2 k2, p6, k4, p6, k2

1 Yo, ssk, p6, c4f, p6, k2tog, yo
2 K2, p6, k4, p6, k2
3 K2tog, yo, p5, c3b, c3f, p5, yo, ssk
4 K2, p5, k2, p2, k2, p5, k2
5 Yo, ssk, p4, c3b, p2, c3f, p4, k2tog, yo
6 K2, p4, k2, p4, k2, p4, k2
7 K2tog, yo, p3, c3b, p4, c3f, p3, yo, ssk
8 K2, p3, k2, p6, k2, p3, k2
9 Yo, ssk, p2, c3b, c3b, c3f, c3f, p2, k2tog, yo
10 K2, p2, k2, p1, k2, p2, k2, p1, k2, p2, k2
11 K2tog, yo, p1, c3b, c3b, p2, c3f, c3f, p1, yo, ssk
12 K2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p4, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2
13 Yo, ssk, p1, k1, c2f, c3f, p2, c3b, c2b, k1, p1, k2tog, yo
14 K2, p1, (k1, p1) twice, k2, p2, k2, (p1, k1) twice, p1, k2
15 K2tog, yo, p1, k1, p1, c2f, c3f, c3b, c2b, p1, k1, p1, yo, ssk
16 K2, p1, k1, p2, k1, p1, k4, p1, k1, p2, k1, p1, k2
17 Yo, ssk, p1, c2f, c2b, p1, c4f, p1, c2f, c2b, p1, k2tog, yo
18 K2, p2, k2, p2, k4, p2, K2, p2, k2
(18*optional way for Row 18: K2, p2, c2f, p2, K4, p2, c2b, p2, k2. You will join the two lines framing the hart this way. This is not shown in pictures.)

Repeat rows 3-18 or 3-18* once.

Armhole decrease:
Work the 4 edge sts as garter st. Do the decrease from right side. After 4 edge sts, SSK.
Before 4 edge sts: k2tog.

PATTERN

Rib edge:
Cast on 95[105, 115, 125] st, join to begin working in rounds. K1, p2, then begins Rib pattern 1, continue to the end of the row. Place one marker on the first stitch of the row, and the 50th[56th, 60th, 66th] of the row, so you will have 48[54, 58, 64] sts for the front (between the two markers), and 45[51, 55, 59] for the back. You will do decrease, and later increase, before and after the two stitches. Continue in ribs for 9 other rows or until desired length.

St st waist shaping
Next row: Start St st, at the same time, decrease 4 sts in this row before and after the marker (marker, SSK, st sts, K2tog, marker, SSK, st sts, K2 tog). Work St st before the eyelet row in every 4th row for 3[3, 4, 4] more times, or until desired width. Work until the piece reach the position where you want to place the eyelet row.

Eyelet row (Waistline):
Yo, k2 tog throughout. Do the last 2 sts as yo, k, so the back will be even-numbered now. Knit 1 row. Move stitch markers onto this row if needed.

Begin the cable panel:
following either written instructions or the chart:
Knit 11[12, 15, 18] sts, Cable panel, knit to the end of the row. AT THE SAME TIME, increase for bust on row 3 of the pattern, following the increase note as in the pattern notes. Increase on every 4[4, 3, 2]row for 3[3, 4, 5]more times, or until desired width. Continue st st for the back.

When piece measures 31[31, 32, 33] cm, begin armhole shaping and start to work back and forth.

Front:
Bind off 2[2, 3, 3] sts at a time, work in pattern until the second stitch marker. Knit this stitch. Turn. Next row: Bind off 2[2, 3, 3] sts at a time. Knit the K st and purl the P st. Then do the armhole decrease as in the pattern note. 1 st at each end on every row 2[2, 3, 3] times, then on every other row 3[3, 4, 4] times. Work until the end of Cable panel. Continue to work armhole and lace lines as before, and first work those 16 sts between lace lines as purl st for 4[4, 6, 6] rows, then knit across for 4[4, 6, 6] rows. Start Neckline: Hold center 10[10. 12. 12] st on a holder or a length or wast yarn. Left front (RS): continue in pattern and k2tog on the last two sts for neckline. Decrease on RS until there are 10[10, 12, 12] sts remains. Shape the right front in reverse.

Back:
Bind off in the same fashion as the front. Decrease until 38[] sts on the needles. Work the armhole shaping and St st in between until 2 rows more than front before shaking the neckline. Shape the neckline as the front.

FINISHING
Using 3 needle bind-off to join shoulders and bind off. Using a pair of smaller needles, pick up 24 [26, 28, 30]st on each side, between those on hold. Join and work Rib pattern 2, using this pair of needles. After 4cm in ribs, change to smaller needles if you’d like to have a snug-fit collars, as shown in pictures. After the collar reaches the desired length, break yarn. Join CC, holding two strings together, and bind off loosely with them.

Block lightly.

Read Full Post »

Knitting for me should be very relaxing. Solely for this reason, I can say that I don’t really enjoy double knitting. Meanwhile, I can’t stand the slow progress of making the albeit beautiful argyle scarf! So I ask myself: don’t I need to make life easier at this time of the year, when pressure isn’t lessened AND there are some other Christmas knits to be done?

So I decided I need to make another scarf for the intended recipient! I flipped through my Stitchionary for inspiration. Before long, a new decision is made: I’d make a scarf with herringbone pattern! The pattern is mindless yet the completed piece will have a sophisticated look, just the perfect thing for my recipient!

See how it grows:
this will be the replacement scarf

I literally follow the pattern 176 from Stitchinary 1. That’s how I make it if you’d like to know.

1. The yarns:

A: Lana Grossa Pashmina, gray. 2 to 3 balls.

B: Contrasting colour in 4ply (use two strings together) or DK. I am using Rowan Yorkshire Tweed 4ply in off-white.

2. The pattern (not a very conventional style of noting):

HB: Right side, wyif slip 2, knit 2; Wrong side, wyib slip 2, purl 2.
A (RS) K1, *HB*, K1
B (WS) K1, Pl, *HB* until the last two sts, P1, K1
C (RS) K3, *HB*, do the last st as K1
D (WS) K1, sl 1 in pattern, P2, *HB* until the last two sts, sl 1, K1

3. how it goes:
Cast on 38 st. (you need to cast on a multiple of 4 plus 2, and probably using needles two size bigger than you’re going to knit), purl one row if preferred (using the normal size).
Do (A, B, C, D) x 3, (C, B, A, D) x 3 (so thetotal repeat is 24 rows.)

Edge stitches on both side: After three 24-row repeats, on right side, slip the edge stitches, on wrong side, knit them.

After a desired length, break off yarns. Use two strings of yarn B, work 5 rows of St st. break off yarns, reattach yarn A and continue the herringbone pattern (work both sides of edge stitch as garter st). After 2.5 24-row repeats, knit one row then bind off very loosely.

Lightly block or ironed if needed.

The result will be a herringbone pattern on a stock st base, with garter st edge. If you’d like to have a broader edge for either garter st or moss st, just add more sts on both sides. There ere are several other way to do herringbone, other than slip stitch. For example, this one and this one. Slip stitch version is my favourite (I love slip stitch patterns) but it will grow slower than the abovementioned patterns.

As for the argyle scarf, my boyfriend quickly said that he doesn’t mind waiting if he could have that!

Ps. I did a google search after drafting this entry and found that Henry from Knitty (Fall 07) was using exactly the same pattern, though in different style of pattern writing. The knitty scarf was knitted lengthwise. Judging from my experiences of slip stitch knitting, you would really need to pay attention to both cast-on and cast-off.

Read Full Post »

This shot should not be uploaded just yet, because the object is for a swap and I always try not to spoil the fun! What you see from the pic is a partial view of a Blythe dress, in which I use the Cross stitch pattern and a verrsion of lacy lattice pattern. (pre-blocked though…)

This is definitely not a swatch

I can’t believe that there are so many people interested in the cross stitch pattern when I post it on Sunday. I did think it’s unusual, but I never thought that the instruction is no where to be found via google! or at least that’s the result of initial serach, and I haven’t clicked each page for more details. It is not that I don’t want to share how to do it but that I prefer to make sure there won’t be copyrights infraction if I type the pattern here. I first learned this pattern from Vogue Dictionanry of Knitting Stitches, by Anne Matthews. If you’ve got this book, dig it out, and turn to the drop stitch section, you’ll find it!! But I “remembered” I’ve seen it somewhere, in one of my vintage patter collection. Anyone knows if typing someone’s pattern on a blog will be fine?

So here’s comes a minor surprise when I checked The Stitch of the Day section on knitting daily today! The pattern featured today is “Extended open-work” stitch. If you saw my post today, you can probably see it on knitting daily. It will be gone tomorrow so be quick!! But don’t be sad if you didn’t catch up–their “Stitch of the Day” comes from Harmony Guides, so you may as well buy yourself one. Harmony Guides are great stitch dictionaries, and are on my wishing list! (My knitting books grow quicker than I intended them to be, so I won’t get them just yet. And I am keener to get Barbara Walker’s books at this moment.)

But this pattern isn’t exactly the same one I am using.

There are two significant differences. First, the one from Harmony Guides is more like a cable. You just don’t build up these cables, but break them with a purl line (seeing from the right side). While I did point out in my previous post, the one from Vogue is similar to cables, they are achieved from inside the loops.

Second, the Harmony Guides uses wrapped stitches, but the Vogue one uses drop stitches. The difference isn’t that easy to tell but they are not the same. Wrapped stitches look neater, drop stitches look more fun!

(I do dislike written instruction, but it doesn’t mean I can or don’t read them. Plus, when it comes to patterns with photos, I can probably tell you how to do something just by the photos. ^_^)

I think you have to sign up for knitting daily to see the stitch, but I find myself enjoying reading it! You find lots of promotions from Intereweave Knits and their sister companies indeed, but the editor Sandi Wisehear talks about lots of knitting tips that is more than useful. For example, she writes about how to convert flat knitting to circular knitting, in which she briefs nicely on all techniques I knew from experiences.

Anyways, that’s it for today. If I’ve got time, I’ll swatch both patterns and put them together. Don’t expect me to do it quick though…. I was actually planned the dress with another drop stitch pattern, “Butterfly pattern,” but only after two complete rows did I remember I forgot a stitch, so I unravel the piece and choose the cross stitch instead–it’s quicker and easier!

Oh, and I think I’ll be in on Ravelry Friday. I will be out, away from computer until late, and have to leave early on Sat! And don’t even have time for Ally Pally! (or will I??) Oh, why, oh, why???

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »