Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘cashmere’

Earlier this week, I won a new fibre related gadget–a set of ball winder and a swift! The set was a vintage wooden set made in the 1940s or 1950s, with a yellowed instruction. It must’ve got stored away during these years. I was just watching a ball winder, not wanting a swift, but how could I resist a lovely set as such?

my new toy 3

Here are two of its earlier tasks: one’s showing a wound skein I am going to use for a stole and another was a result of frogging a drop-stitch stole. Not that I didn’t like the latter but not having enough of the same yarns hence the frogging. With a little help of a wool winder, why afraid of frogging? The moment the white ball was wound completely, I had decided to frog two 2007 FOs and save those yarns for better use (I shall write more later on them).

my new toy 1my new toy 2

(my poor blythe dolls silently sat there watching a knitting activity not devoted to them…)

I don’t consider I am into sock knitting but the past few days this particular genre had more than its share of knitting time.

I managed to finished my first sock, a variation of Cookie A’s Baudelaire.
P1200610 The curse of late completion must be to do with my dislike of the poet with the same name and getting bored with the pattern, so it was stuck for months when there’s only two pattern repeats away. And the cashmere yarn is a joy to wear now, but not so when I knitted them, because they were oiled.

Then I am a lover of herringbone patterns, so I decided to use two different herringbone patterns for a new pair. There were many sock yarns in my stash, but this is the first occasion I am actually using one–all those changes of colours dazzled me, even just a bit. The two herringbone patterns would look better with a solid colour. But I will knitted the second sock. I WILL. I’ll also write up the pattern later.

herringbone zigzag socks-looking downherringbone zigzag socks- side
Then a third pair, haven’t got a decent photo yet.

I also have to take photos of my two other FOs of 2008–both from Linea Rossa booklet. 🙂

Read Full Post »

I know I will thank myself for keeping knitting notes, the sole purpose of this blog–I shall keep this blog alive! here are notes of the week.

*Few notes on Heartening

Last week, I wonder if I should knit another “Heartening”, so I can show you the slightly different version with the heart jointed. What harm can be done for just one more vest? Or better, making “Heartening” as a puff-sleeved, collared top just like Number 22 from the latest Vogue Knitting? I do have Soft Tweed in Twig enough for a sleeved top! I cast on after I found myself couldn’t sleep one night.

Making “Heartening” is fun. But even though the whole process is lovely, it would become dull had I gone through the same procedure again. I eventually didn’t survive the waistline and had my mind changed: Twig is a lovely shade and it would suit my boyfriend perfectly! Why didn’t I just do that but play with the same pattern?

Indeed so. I stopped after the waist shaping. But since I was with the WIP, I may as well knit a semi-swatch to show you the different Row 18 of the heart shaped cable pattern. The one on the right is Row 18* and the one on the left is Row 18. This semi-swatch is unblocked, so it looks a bit ugly, but enough to show their differences (I put some notes directly onto this shot on my flickr, please click to link to my flickr if needed).
heartening hearty shapes

If you like Row 18* more and you knit from the chart, please also read the pattern instruction first! The chart is showing the effect seeing from the right side, however, you will need to knit Row 18 from the wrong side!

And two picture showing FO done months ago.
Wintery stockingsLana Grossa wraparound

It seems I have the tendency to take photos after FOs are wore, and got felted? I post these pictures on my flickr first, but only manage to blog them here now. I am quite surprise to know people love the Highland Stockings! It’s absolutely gorgeous! It is quite a pity that Rowan didn’t provide a chart but with written instruction only. Moreover, Rowan put the skill level as most difficult one. Certainly reading the pattern is punishing to me so, as I put in another post, I charted them out when I decided to knit the stockings. I was convinced that had them put up charts the pattern would be popular.

Read Full Post »

Knitting for me should be very relaxing. Solely for this reason, I can say that I don’t really enjoy double knitting. Meanwhile, I can’t stand the slow progress of making the albeit beautiful argyle scarf! So I ask myself: don’t I need to make life easier at this time of the year, when pressure isn’t lessened AND there are some other Christmas knits to be done?

So I decided I need to make another scarf for the intended recipient! I flipped through my Stitchionary for inspiration. Before long, a new decision is made: I’d make a scarf with herringbone pattern! The pattern is mindless yet the completed piece will have a sophisticated look, just the perfect thing for my recipient!

See how it grows:
this will be the replacement scarf

I literally follow the pattern 176 from Stitchinary 1. That’s how I make it if you’d like to know.

1. The yarns:

A: Lana Grossa Pashmina, gray. 2 to 3 balls.

B: Contrasting colour in 4ply (use two strings together) or DK. I am using Rowan Yorkshire Tweed 4ply in off-white.

2. The pattern (not a very conventional style of noting):

HB: Right side, wyif slip 2, knit 2; Wrong side, wyib slip 2, purl 2.
A (RS) K1, *HB*, K1
B (WS) K1, Pl, *HB* until the last two sts, P1, K1
C (RS) K3, *HB*, do the last st as K1
D (WS) K1, sl 1 in pattern, P2, *HB* until the last two sts, sl 1, K1

3. how it goes:
Cast on 38 st. (you need to cast on a multiple of 4 plus 2, and probably using needles two size bigger than you’re going to knit), purl one row if preferred (using the normal size).
Do (A, B, C, D) x 3, (C, B, A, D) x 3 (so thetotal repeat is 24 rows.)

Edge stitches on both side: After three 24-row repeats, on right side, slip the edge stitches, on wrong side, knit them.

After a desired length, break off yarns. Use two strings of yarn B, work 5 rows of St st. break off yarns, reattach yarn A and continue the herringbone pattern (work both sides of edge stitch as garter st). After 2.5 24-row repeats, knit one row then bind off very loosely.

Lightly block or ironed if needed.

The result will be a herringbone pattern on a stock st base, with garter st edge. If you’d like to have a broader edge for either garter st or moss st, just add more sts on both sides. There ere are several other way to do herringbone, other than slip stitch. For example, this one and this one. Slip stitch version is my favourite (I love slip stitch patterns) but it will grow slower than the abovementioned patterns.

As for the argyle scarf, my boyfriend quickly said that he doesn’t mind waiting if he could have that!

Ps. I did a google search after drafting this entry and found that Henry from Knitty (Fall 07) was using exactly the same pattern, though in different style of pattern writing. The knitty scarf was knitted lengthwise. Judging from my experiences of slip stitch knitting, you would really need to pay attention to both cast-on and cast-off.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »